Lindsay Lewis

English/ ESL consultant: Word worker, writer, teacher, mentor and poet. Author of This Won’t Hurt a Bit! on writing clear content.

Blog

School Rules and the Me Too # Movement

Posted by on 10:23 pm in Posts | 0 comments

As an educator with 27 years of teaching experience, and a mentor, I take great interest in my students. I have known one student since he was 4, and he’s now 15. He attends GNS, a private school in Victoria, and told me that the principal of the Middle School has created a “No Contact” rule. What exactly is the nature of this rule, and why was it created? He stated that the school is concerned about being sued for “inappropriate touching”, so students mustn’t touch each other. He believes that it was...

read more

Beating the Odds.

Posted by on 2:02 pm in Posts | 0 comments

Beating the Odds                                                                               by Lindsay Lewis   He thought they had covered eventualities the small assurances of life years of counting carbs and slathering sunscreem petunias, seeding in spring He thought he knew the texture of his life wife at his fingertips filling cups with coffee: Black, rich, dark. He always dealt in answers, measured happiness with yardstick precision Now he shuffles questions on unfamiliar ground: This why is not his At night only the tick tick of...

read more

The hostage taking: Words

Posted by on 1:58 pm in Posts | 0 comments

Hostage taking                                                                                                                                       By Lindsay Lewis   Enclosed in the pale envelope of sleep the words invade, with tiny timbers in their hand, battering my brain Any poet knows, you cannot bargain with a word. They must have their say, adamant on winning. Words are worthless alone, they travel in groups, sibilants, consonants charging around the room pecking like absent minded birds perching on the roof of my mouth....

read more

My first poem: How to write a metaphor.

Posted by on 1:52 pm in Posts | 0 comments

How does one craft a poem? Students are baffled by poetry, for it breaks all the conventions. I often refer to poems as orange concentrate. Take out all of the water, and just keep the oranges, full and bursting with flavour. Take out small words- prepositions and articles, and let the nouns and verbs sing. This is the first poem I wrote when I was seventeen, and it was published in Grain Magazine. Tree                                                                                                                                             ...

read more

FOLDING: A poem by Lindsay Lewis

Posted by on 1:48 pm in Posts | 0 comments

I wrote this poem as a tribute to a woman I met when I worked as a nurse’s aide. She was young- in her fifties- a remarkable pianist, and stricken with dementia. She passed her time organizing our linen carts, and occasionally had lucid moments in which we could engage in brilliant conversation. Her husband was a devoted, loving man who took the ferry every day to visit her. I was deeply moved by this experience. FOLDING There was a woman I once knew confined to the wing of a ward in a hospital doomed at fifty to a life of folding....

read more

The Poetree. Poems by Lindsay Lewis

Posted by on 1:44 pm in Posts | 0 comments

Almost We tossed around the word almost the last time we met our life an egg and spoon race against the clock Don’t fall for me, you said. Don’t project, I replied knowing we’d passed the expiration date. I could conjugate you all night change your endings to make them agree. At 1 a.m, I rise, boil two eggs, smile wryly yearning to spoon you and later, when I close my eyes in bed the side I let you take that my husband never shared you are with me your unfathomable sky fills my mind in a place that almost exists We could...

read more

Mangled modifiers thanks to Google translate

Posted by on 10:57 pm in Posts | 0 comments

For those of you who know I’m studying Italian, you will appreciate the humour. This is from a newspaper article in Milano Today, an Italian newspaper. This will give hope to language lovers and linguists everywhere that we can’t be replaced by computers. According to the translation, an accident, flew two meters and broke a windshield, thanks to a serious thirty year old. What were they trying to say? A thirty year old was seriously injured in a car accident, and flew two meters through the windshield.   Thank you Italian...

read more

L’Avvocato Porto- an Italian series with Luigi Proietti as Alexandro

Posted by on 5:00 pm in Posts | 0 comments

Learning another language is my passion and joy. The words themselves are so fun to learn, and Italian is so old feeling and lovely to speak. I’m watching a series about an Italian lawyer, a lovable, bumbling but bright character trying to solve a cold case of a prostitute who has been murdered. Watching videos is wonderful for learning another language because you hear all the small, natural words such as “al proposito” and “per se.” The best part, however, is the cultural humour. In the lawyer’s house,...

read more

Reading audio books

Posted by on 3:33 pm in Posts | 0 comments

In addition to teaching, I’m now narrating children’s audio books. It’s extremely fun and interesting work, as I’m doing cold reading, meaning I have no idea what the story is about, or what events will happen. Today’s stories included a child being picked up by a giant in a forest, and taken to his house. The giant was cooking other children ( horror!) I tried not to stumble reading that! – but at the end of the story, the giant picks up the child in his hand and he dies of fright. The author then states...

read more

Italiano- que bella ! Looking at familiar words through new eyes.

Posted by on 6:31 pm in Posts | 0 comments

I’m studying Italian and che bella language. I was reading the history of the Medici family, and noticed the word Parliamento.  When I think of the word Parliament, I of course imagine the Parliament buildings, but in fact, the original Parliament was obviously related to the root PARLE  – to speak. In fact, the signores would gather in Florence to discuss matters of political importance. So many of the words are Greek and Latin cognates- and they share much with Spanish and French. Tavola, le table…. Another fascinating...

read more